Millennials Are Freaking Out Because A Survey Says 1 In 6 Of Them Have $100k In Savings

by Elana

While it sometimes may seem confusing, millennials have been defined as those born between 1981-1996. They're all well into adulthood now, but it hasn't been an easy-breezy ride. If you fit into this demographic you probably have a lot of ideas about what life should look like today, so let me ask you this? Do you have a bajillion dollars saved up? Okay, that's a silly question. But it's not far from the absurdity released not too long ago by Bank of America.

Bank of America put it in its 2018 Winter report: a survey shows that 16 percent of millennials (or roughly one in six 23 to 37-year-olds) have 100,000 dollars or more saved up. As soon as CNBC tweeted the fact, Millennials across the Internet definitively lost their shit.

The tweet that started the chaos.

For an entire generation of people who are collectively struggling, the concept of having any savings is almost impossible, let alone $100,000.

The tweet that started the chaos.
via: CNBC

It's easy to respond with disbelief because it sounds... impossible.

It's easy to respond with disbelief because it sounds... impossible.

...Because this is more plausible since so many of us grew up playing The Sims.

A more likely result:

A more likely result:

In an interview with Bored Panda, Sam Dogen, a financial expert behind the blog Financial Samurai said:

I absolutely believe more than 1 in 6 millennials should have at least 100,000 dollars or more saved up if they ever want to achieve financial independence and not work at a job they hate for the rest of their lives.
via: giphy

College debt is staggering for Millennials.

College debt is staggering for Millennials.

If the bills even get paid...

If the bills even get paid...

Dogen also said:

Based on my 401(k) savings by age guide, you should have the following saved in your pre-tax retirement account by age:
-100,000 – 300,000 dollars by age 30
-250,000 – 1,000,000 dollars by age 40
-600,000 – 2,250,000 dollars by age 50
-1,000,000 – 5,000,000 dollars by age 60.
via: giphy

Savings? Did you mean debt?

Savings? Did you mean debt?
via: ZhugeEX

Some people think that perhaps the bank's survey wasn't a large enough pool of people, because it cannot be accurate.

Some people think that perhaps the bank's survey wasn't a large enough pool of people, because it cannot be accurate.

Dogen told Bored Panda:

If you want to retire before 60, you need to save even more in online brokerage account and other non-tax advantageous accounts. You can’t withdraw funds from your 401(k) or IRA before 59.5 without a 10% penalty.

Dogen also offers a guide for "after tax investment amounts by age."

via: giphy

To put this into much better perspective, the survey is basically moot.

To put this into much better perspective, the survey is basically moot.

If you know, you know.

If you know, you know.

Dogen also advises that your mindset matters, he said:

You have to get in the right money mindset. If you are already telling yourself it is impossible to save money, of course, you’re not going to do everything possible to save money. My #1 piece of advice is: if the amount of money you’re saving each month doesn’t hurt, you’re not saving enough.
via: giphy

The jokes rolled in on Twitter.

The jokes rolled in on Twitter.
via: GMSarli

Quite frankly, almost any millennial out there can resonate with the hysterical responses.

Quite frankly, almost any millennial out there can resonate with the hysterical responses.

Hey, BOA, we're gonna need some more details.

Hey, BOA, we're gonna need some more details.

Dogen also advised what to do next:

After you make saving money painful, then you’ve got to take on side hustles to make even more money. Freelancing online, driving a car, assembling furniture, tutoring, mowing lawns are examples of some common side hustles.
via: giphy

Disclaimer, wink-wink.

Disclaimer, wink-wink.

Honestly... same.

Honestly... same.

*laughs in depression*

*laughs in depression*

The Financial Samurai encourages you, that you can adapt:

The absolute bare minimum is to save at least 20 percent of your income after tax each month. If 20 percent feels like a lot, don’t worry. You will get used to living with 80 percent of your income or working other jobs to boost your income.
via: tenor

The doubt is intensifying.

The doubt is intensifying.

Dogen said:

If 20 percent doesn’t feel like enough, it’s imperative you keep ratcheting up your savings rate until you need to make lifestyle changes. Your ultimate goal is to try and achieve a 50 percent savings rate after taxes. Once you get there, every year you work will equal one year of living expenses.
via: giphy

Anecdotal but still relatable.

Anecdotal but still relatable.

This is probable.

This is probable.

And then everyone clapped.

And then everyone clapped.

Hold up.

Hold up.

Sometimes you gotta lie to get by.

Sometimes you gotta lie to get by.

Mars is far more likely.

Mars is far more likely.

As the tweet continued to make it's way through social media, people began to discuss the how and why saving is so difficult.

As the tweet continued to make it's way through social media, people began to discuss the how and why saving is so difficult.

Highly unlikely even from Gen X perspective.

Highly unlikely even from Gen X perspective.

Sure, it sounds lovely. Doesn't it?

Sure, it sounds lovely. Doesn't it?

So. Much. Doubt.

So. Much. Doubt.

This tomfoolery has gone on long enough.

This tomfoolery has gone on long enough.

Life is expensive ASF.

Life is expensive ASF.

Just zip it, yo.

Just zip it, yo.

Savings? SAVINGS?

Savings? SAVINGS?

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